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petraeus, has been holding security talks in pakistan as divisions deepen between washington and islamabad. the u.s. is holding hundreds of millions of dollars in security assistance. pakistan has called for an end to u.s. drone raids that have been taking an increasing civilian toll. >> u.s. drones' fly it around the clock in pakistan, targeting fighters in the mountainous region bordering afghanistan. civilians are often killed in the attacks. pakistan has condemned the ground strikes as a violation of its sovereignty, although some analysts believe they are carried out with the help of pakistan the -- pakistani intelligence. >> we are firmly against all terrorist groups. but we fight in partnership with other law-enforcement agencies. >> washington announced it was holding back a third of the military aid earmarked for pakistan, $100 million. airstrikes are putting more pressure on the already tense relationship between the u.s. and pakistan. >> give the pakistan government the drones. that is the way it should be. [unintelligible] >> the dispute shows no sign of easing. islamabad is th
efforts in pakistan, we are joined by uzma tahrir, joining us on the line from islamabad. in your view, how successful have the rehabilitation efforts been in the past years? -- in the past year? >> thank you very much for taking us on board. the magnitude is so huge. it is not possible to complete the respond to it. right now, the most pressing issues [no audio] there is nothing to go back to. they're starting from scratch. i think the most pressing issue is the coordination between the different departments and the other organizations on the ground. in needs to be more strengthened. and the people do not have enough food. definitely not for the coming months. they cannot continue without the food support and the support of the government. >> a lot of pressing issues that are impacting pakistan, predictably when you're on after the flood -- particularly one year later after the flood. what can your group do to expedite the process? >> actually, what we are doing at the moment is to work as an organization in 14 different places. but pakistan is struggling with the process of devolutio
by america's highest-ranking military officer, admiral mike mullen, the government in islamabad sanctioned the killing of a pakistani journalist. saleem shahzad was kidnapped near his home in may. his body was found two days later in punjab province. joining me now from islamabad is aleem maqbool. aleem, the circumstances of his death were really quite staggering. inevitably it provoked a row. >> yes, that's right. he was killed at the end of may. he was picked up very close to here one evening, and he was found beaten to death a couple of days later. saleem shahzad had just written an article about what he found was a link about elements within pakistan's navy and al qaeda. it's something that is an issue that still very much taboo here in pakistan. authorities come down very harshly on those who write about topics like that. there are a lot of people in pakistan who felt, in the media, human rights groups, that the intelligence agency, the very powerful intelligence agency here, the i.s.i., was involved in that. it's something that caused a lot of criticism of the i.s.i. and authorities.
. days after he went missing, shahzad's body was found outside islamabad. discloser could further strain the worsening relationship with pakistan. the white house says it's now looking into how the u.s. will present the intelligence to pakistan's leadership. >>> the mexican navy now says that seven americans are missing after a charter fishing boat capsized off mexico's baja peninsula yesterday. as crews search for survivors, officials confirm one american is dead and 35 passengers have already been rescued. initial reports from mexico say the boat overturned in the sea of cortez after it was hit by two giant waves. >> reporter: the fisher moen had been bobbing in the sea of cortez for hours before anyone knew the boat had capsized. clinging to coolers hoping to be plucked from the water. the lucky ones were. one never made it it's very difficult to find people in the water. it's a small object in a large body of water. >> reporter: they had set off on the eric, a 115-liver boat. it left the turquoise waters of san felipe on saturday, bound for a fourth of july excursion. but by saturday
a video on their web site in ace lam brad, and you can -- islamabad and, actually, you can see it wasn't -- those who taught, and this was a mixed audience of civilians and military, so it wasn't just the military officers there, we should be very clear about that. but those who taught that al-qaeda was the major threat and those who thought the united states was a major threat were more or less equal in number. there were less people concerned about india. so that's the, that's the correct, factual position. it was just after the abbotbad incident in which osama bin laden was taken out, and the feeling in pakistan was the had violated afghanistan's sovereignty in doing that, the u.s. could have done the same with pakistan's cooperation. so that was the divide within pakistan that was reflect inside that. it's not just a very -- a simplistic analysis of it would be, you know, it's more nuanced. even those people who didn't mind osama bin laden being taken out, they thought the u.s. shouldn't have done it unilaterally. it's like, you know, i have a problem in my backyard, but you can ri
but it's pushing up pressure of islamabad to push out. >> pakistan is home to many terrorists. they are home to the headquarters of al-qaeda who still is an organization that plots to kill as many americans as they possibly can. it's home to other terrorist organizations. >> reporter: admiral mullen talks about a strategic partnership between the u.s. and afghanistan, saying it will take some time. >> it takes hard negotiation and a very clear understanding of what the issues are on both sides and that work is ongoing. >> reporter: meanwhile a series of deadly attacks continue across the country. on the day before the islamic holy month of ramadon begins, a bombing killed 10 people. the taliban claims responsibility for the attack which targeted police officers. there are about 100,000 american troops currently in afghanistan. under president obama's plan, 10,000 will be brought home this year and another 23,000 by the end of next summer. in new york, lauren green, fox news. >>> it is one of those phenomenon that you can't just take your eyes off. a volcano spewing lava from t
sayah is following this for us. >> live in islamabad. something that has been talked about a lot, this threat hanging over the relationship. will we take away money. they seem to answer saying, do it. >> yeah. the message from pakistan is a defiant one. they're essentially saying you can keep your money, we don't need it. he spoke with a spokesperson for the military here and he claimed pakistan has been launching these operations against militant groups in northwest pakistan without u.s. help and without u.s. money and he claimed that those operations will continue. the problem is, those statements don't square with previous demands made by the pakistani government from the u.s. demands for more money, more resources, precisely to fight these militant groups. he sees some gamesmanship there by pakistani officials. if you look at the move from washington, the withholding of $800 million. a move that could substantially change the complexion of this troubled relationship. previously out of washington, we had heard a lot of accusations, finger pointing, rhetoric, this is certainly
a c.i.a. base. our correspondent, aleem maqbool, is in islamabad, and earlier, i asked him how humiliating this is for pakistan given they need u.s. aid to help pay for security. >> we keep hearing leaks about various things that the american officials are accusing pakistan of doing. certainly the pakistanis feel very much under pressure. they do need the dollars, but not to the extent that we might think, because they do get a large proportion -- the pakistani army gets a large proportion of the domestic budget here, but it is the humiliation more than anything that will help the pakistani army. and yes, the two sides do need each other. nobody's talking about breaking up completely, but it's whether this will have the desired effect that washington wants or not, and that is something we simply can't tell right now. >> aleem maqbool. in syria, supporters of the government and some of its critics are holding a second day of talks in damascus. the government says the national dialogue will help chart a course to multiparty democracy, but many opposition leaders remain skeptical
chairman in islamabad. >>> the effort to harden u.s. airports against terror attacks is coming up short in the opinion of republican congressman jayson chaffetz of utah, who is citing government statistics showing security breaches since september of 2001. the t.s.a. says it represents a small fraction of the 5.5 billion people screened since 9/11. >>> the army ranger awarded the medal of honor tuesday for saving the lives of two buddies in afghanistan says he will be the same soldier he always was. sergeant first class leroy roger petrie honored at the white house tuesday. >> the declaration, it's not depiction of who i am. i am still me. the medal is just a declaration that they thought i deserved. ♪ ♪ >> bret: in america's news headquarters, president obama's re-election campaign had a huge take in the second three months of the year. chief political correspondent carl cameron has the big dollar picture. >> president obama raised half a million dollars a day for the last three months. $58 million from a half a million donors in the second quarter. alongside $38 million raised by
home. >>> and joining us now from islamabad, our national security analyst peter bergen. peter, this assassination of the half brother of hamid karzai, the half brother ahmad wali karzai, who is responsible for this? >> it's still a little murky about who's ultimately responsible. it's clear one of his bodyguards, a longtime associate, killed ahmad wali karzai, had access to him, was able to this. quite what his motivations are are murky. the taliban have claimed responsibility. the fact is ahmad wali karzai, known as awk in afghanistan, had a wide range of enemies inclu including people potentially within his own family which is pretty large. but also, you know, people in the political scene in kandahar, which he controlled largely, there were allegations he was involved in drug trafficking. you know, so, wolf, you know, while we know the identity of the assailant, we don't really understand the motivations and who put this bodyguard up to this attack. >> how did it happen? >> well, the bodyguard took him into a room and obviously this is somebody that had spent, you know, man
in an operational role leading al qaeda in a town 35 miles from islamabad. it is clear he had some sort of support mechanism there. i don't think at this point we know all the elements of that support mechanism and we're still obviously working through that. we have a tremendous amount of information that we recovered from the abbottabad compound where osama bin laden operated. we continue to work through that. but at this point, i don't have any evidence that has been shown to me which would indicate the pakistani leadership and the military, the intelligence services are foreknowledge here. the fact is he did operate there for an extended period of time and that raises a lot of questions and those questions are being asked in pakistan. >>> when we come back, i ask tom donilon, the national securitied avieders, if there san obama doctrine and does it involve leading from behind? >>> we are back with tom donilon, national security adviser to president obama. is there a obama doctrine? >> here's how i would answer that question. what we have been about since the outset of the administration is to r
there is paranoia in islamabad and mumbai and new dele. american officials have long complained that pakistan doesn't focus enough on its terror groups and focuses too much on india cha they say is not a threat. >> india has been very clear. they have been clear three years ago when they said this will not happen again without a response from india. also how this plays off on the afghanistan conflict is very real. india has five different consulates in afghanistan. two of which are on the border of afghanistan and pakistan. they're having a regional conference in pakistan in december of this year which ironically does not include india many the conversation. it's iran, afghanistan and pakistan. how this plays out and what india finds its role in combatting terrorism in its country is very real at this point. >> meanwhile in afghanistan we had the appalling assassination of a controversial figure karzai's half brother, step brother. someone who has been criticized for being corrupt in the past, but most recently has been a key player as the u.s. tries to stabilize its forces in the south. >> absolut
role leading al qaeda in a town 35 miles from islamabad. it is clear he had some sport solve support mechanism there. i don't think at this point know all of the elements of thaf support mechanism and we are working through that. we have tremendous amount of informationing that we recovered from the compound where osama bin laden operated. we continue to work through that. but at this point, i don't know any evidence shown to me that would indicate the pakistani leadership and the military, political military services had foreign knowledge there. but he did operate there for an extended period of time and those questions are being asked in pakistan. >> when we come back, i will ask if there is an obama doctrine and does it involve leading from behind? i don't want you going out on those yet. and leave your phone in your purse, i don't want you texting. >> daddy... ok! ok, here you go. be careful. >> thanks dad. >> and call me--but not while you're driving. we knew this day was coming. that's why we bought a subaru. ♪ ♪ [ male announcer ] and just like that, it's here. a new chanc
to track down osama bin laden. reza sayah live from islamabad this morning. how did the sting work and how did the doctor's arrest impact the already damaged relationship between the u.s. and pakistan? >> yeah. this thing straight out of a spy novel, kiran. a pakistani intelligence source tells us that this pakistani doctor is in custody. it's not clear if he's going to be charged with anything. we know he's suspected of being linked with a very intricate cia plot to confirm that, indeed, bin laden was hiding out in abbottbad. the source tells us this doctor had staged a fake vaccination campaign offering free vaccinations and polio drops to people and children in abbottbad. according to the british paper "the guardian" he hired two nurses who were going around house to house offering shots and the plan was to use the vaccine, the syringe, from the bin laden kids or extract blood from them and match that dna with the dna from blood from bin laden's sister who passed away in boston, massachusetts, last year. we did talk to a number of residents in abbottbad today. indeed they say in late ap
there are indications that it will stagger forward despite the troubles. >> reza sayah in islamabad. thanks so much. >>> imagine being told a child born into slavely in 1860 was more likely to be raised in a two-parent household than an african-american baby born today. i'll tell you which group made the reference and discuss why it is being connected to michelle bachmann and rick san to rum after the break.torum after the break. sometimes, i worry my pipes might leak. but i learned there's something more i can do. now, i take care with vesicare. once-daily vesicare can help control your bladder muscle and is proven to treat overactive bladder with symptoms of frequent urges and leaks day and night. if you have certain stomach or glaucoma problems, or trouble emptying your bladder, do not take vesicare. vesicare may cause allergic reactions that may be serious. if you experience swelling of the face, lips, throat or tongue, stop taking vesicare and get emergency help. tell your doctor right away if you have severe abdominal pain, or become constipated for three or more days. vesicare may cause blur
better behavior out of islamabad. >> right now they have taken some steps that give us reason to pause on some of the aid we were giving to their mill tashgs and we're trying to work through that. but until we get through these difficulties, we will hold back some of the money that the american taxpayers have committed to giving them. >> some $800 million. >> yes. >> in advance of tonight's debt-reduction meeting at the white house, the obama administration sent out treasury secretary timothy geithner for yet another red alert about what will happen if p congress fails to raise the debt ceiling. >> no responsible leader would say the united states, for the first time in its history, should not pay its bills and meet its obligations. that would be catastrophic for the economy. everybody understands that. >> senate republican leader mitch mcconnell says he's for a big deal as long as it doesn't include tax increases. he insists just talking about it has spooked the marketplace. >> if you're in the private sector right now and you're trying to decide whether to expand, what do you see the
these drive home the fact that the relationship between islamabad and washington is in the tank. it's struggling. it started deteriorating after the raid on the bin laden compound. it's no secret that pakistan didn't like how this raid went down. of course, the u.s. taking unilateral action without informing pakistan. pakistan used this as a violation of their sovereignty. immediately after that raid, they've arrested a number of people suspected of being involved with the cia, setting up their network of intelligence here. the latest being this doctor. it's not clear why he was picked up or if he's going to be charged. it could be this is pay back to washington or payback for some of these pakistanis who helped the cia. another likely reason could be that the pakistani intelligence agencies simply want to find out how the cia set up this elaborate network on their soil behind their back. >> thank you so much for the update. >>> in another sign of deepening distrust between the two allies, this week, the white house announced it's cutting off about a third of the aid going to pakist
to the u.s. embassy in islamabad, the 1961 agreement allows them to move freely. the u.s. is working with pakistan to try to resolve this issue. >> arthel: a texas gun store's phone has been ringing off the hook since some quick thinking employees likely prevented a deadly attack. greg ebert of guns galore called police to report a suspicious customer last week. that customer was arrested the very next day, just miles from the fort hood army base with materials that could be used to make bombs. ever since, he and his co-workers have been getting inundated with phone calls, thanking them for their vigilance. guns galore is the same shop where nidal malik hasan purchased a weapon before opening fire on fort hood in 2009. >>> a gun heist in california, more than two dozen assault rifles ripped off from a supply store in fort irwin. it happened july 15. investigators say the thieves made off with 26 ak 74 assault rifles and one sniper rifle. some arrests have been made and so far one of the weapons has been referred. federal authorities are offering a reward of up to $10,000 for informat
was there. cnn's reza sayah joins us live from islamabad. give us a sense about this doctor. he allegedly set up this fake vaccination drive? what was that about? >> reporter: yeah. we've been trying to put together bits and pieces of this alleged plot, and it really gives you a fascinating glimpse of how the cia was operating on the ground here in pakistan before the raid on the bin laden compound. a pakistani official has telling us this doctor has been arrested, accused of helping the cia to confirm the whereabouts of osama bin laden and allegedly stage add free vaccination campaign offering free vaccinations and shots to children and residents of abbottabad where the bin laden compound was located. according to the british paper "the guardian" he hired two nurses going around from house to house. the plan was to get to the bin laden children, somehow extract some of their blood or use the syringe from the vaccination to eventually match their dna sample to bin laden's sister's dna samp. bin laden's sister passing away last year in boston, massachusetts. we haven't been able to verify
. conor powell is streaming live from islamabad. >> reporter: it's no secret that the relationship between pakistan and the united states is at an all-time low after the osama bin laden raid a month or so ago. it's at rock bom rock bottom, ay say the isi was involved in a murder of a journalist. he disappeared and his body was later found. this comes as hillary clinton and others are trying to reset the relationship to get it to a new normal. this kind of a nan must quotes in newspapers and leaks discrediting the isi accusing them of murder undermines the relationship they are trying to rebuild here between the oohed states and pakistan. the pakistanis not surprisingly have denied any involvement in the murder and the death of the journalist. it has created a great bit of anger between the pakistanis and the u.s. there is really no effort at this point that you can see sort of any level to reset this relationship. there is a lot of back fighting, point being the finger behind the scenes, right now two sides that needed each other desperately because of the war in afghanistan, the relations
to make al qaeda terrorists extin extinct. resa, you live in and work in islamabad. you said this is something i've been talking about for much longer than today's headline. >> reporter: al qaeda is, obviously, sensitive issue and been enemy number one in america ten years and anyone who says they are no longer a threat would be deemed foolish by some people, especially far right wing groups in america who think radical islam is still a threat. you look at the "the washington post" article i think it's accurate and i don't think anything new. i've been here a little less than four years and based on what we have seen here, al qaeda, as we knew it, no longer exists and if it still does exist, there is no evidence that it can still carry out a global strategic war against the super power like the u.s. ever since 9/11, for the past ten years, we have bombarded with messages from w. that al qaeda is a global network with tentacles and sleeper cells and scores of countries that are determined to attack the u.s. i don't know about everyone else, but i really haven't seen hard evide
to stop the soviet march toward pakistan and islamabad. we created a huge group of organizations the golden rule is it always happens but yet you come back from a conscript's but instead of doing that, even the other version four that i was there for the more complex version i remember when i was here as a relatively younger man day gain people not to shut down the international military education and training program so you could have military officers having exposure to the united states and they said they could not be bothered because the main concern of afghanistan was over pakistan had to do with the fallout there were the years in pakistan was some of the military successes and political leaders who did not understand and basically to know we just need to divert these guys to use them as the instruments of influence but all of a sudden having the resources to train them and having eclipse them, there was nothing for them. so we have a problem and that is one of the reasons why they don't forget about the outcome. the second reason is the overall negativity toward the united
at the national defense diversity in islamabad. eventually the national defense university put a video on their web site and you can see actually it wasn't sort of you know that those who taught him this was a mixed audience of civilian and military so it wasn't just the military officers there. we should be very clear about that. but those who thought al qaeda was a major threat and those without the united states was a major threat were more or less equal in number. there were less people concerned about india so that is the correct position. it was just after the abbottabad incident in which osama bin laden was taken out, and the feeling in pakistan was that the u.s. had sort of violated pakistan's sovereignty and doing that and the u.s. could have done the same with pakistan's cooperation. and so that was the divide within pakistan reflected in that. is not just a simplistic analysis of it would be it is more nuanced. people didn't mind, even those people who didn't mind it in some of bin laden being taken now they thought the u.s. should have done it unilaterally. it was like you
from islamabad with the latest on that. hi, connor. >> reporter: well, hi, martha. well, to describe the afghan -- or the american/pakistan relationship as stormy is massively becoming a real understatement. it is down right poisonous and hostile at times now. for the last ten years or so, the united states has given about $20 billion to pakistan's military for the larger war on terror. this year alone they were meant to give $2 billion. but over the weekend the white house announced that it's withholding $800 million to the pakistani military. now, officially, the reason is that pakistan has kicked out a bunch of american military trainers, and the u.s. says they're simply not going to give money to the pakistanis for equipment that they can't be trained on. but unofficially, though, this has to do with the larger war on terror in pakistan's refusal to go after insurgents in the tribal region between afghanistan and pakistan. the u.s. is putting a great deal of pressure on pakistan both publicly and privately to do more on the war on terror, especially since the bin laden raid in ma
to may 2. that was the u.s. military raid near islamabad that result in the death of osama bin laden. pakistan, not happy. now, not long after that, pakistan threw out all of the meamerican and british military trainers working with the armed forces, the u.s. this time. not happy. last week, mike mullen accused the government knowing all about the murder of a journalist critical of the government. pakistan denies that and isn't happy. fast forward -- the white house confirms $800 million, more than a third here, a third of the united states annual anti-terrorism aid package to pakistan will be stopped. this is how president obama's chief of staff describes the relationship. and i want you to listen very closely for one word, bill dailey uses more than once. >> complicated relationship and a very difficult complicated part of the world. there's still a lot of pain that the political system in pakistan is feeling by virtue of the raid that we did to get osama bin laden. something that the president felt strongly about. we have no regrets over. but the pakistani relationship is difficul
, we have to speak. we have to come out now to stop such kinds of incidents >> cnn, islamabad. >> happening now, casey anthony will go free in six days, but the raw emotions will go long beyond. the latest on the sentencing and what may lie ahead. >> the murder and terror victims, the owner of the tabloid makes an extraordinary action. with america up to its neck, the president wants a big deal on the debt, but can they reach any kind of deal before it's too late? welcome to the viewers in the united states and around the world. i'm candy crowley and you are in "the situation room". >> sentencing day for casey anthony and those angry at her acquittal. she got years for the four lies she was convicted of telling investigators for credit with time served she is ordered released in just 6 days. in orlando with us, take us through today not just what happened, but the atmospherics. >> it's a very different casey anthony than on the 23rd floor today. different in her appearance. she let her hair down in many ways. she of course had hair up on a bun and in a tight ponytail going bac
of the u.s.-pakistan relations, let's bring in the extreme team. on the team is peter bergen in islamabad. and fred townsend, cnn national security contributor and a member of both the cia and dhs external advisory committees. i'd like to start with you today. is the $800 million in military aid that the u.s. is now holding back, is this a big deal? >> it's a very big deal. it's a place where i think the administration, the obama administration didn't want to have to find themselves, frankly, because it does really do a great deal to hurt relations. that said between not telling them about osama bin laden and the difficulty in the counterterrorism relationship, and most recently, admiral mullen's statements about pakistani involvement and the murder of the journalist, the administration found themselves without much choice. the problem is when you withhold this aid, you withhold support for activities you want them to take. so both countries are under pressure to try to find a way forward. >> does more need to be done here? or is it enough? >> oh, certainly more needs to be done. but we n
. >>> my colleague reza sayah joins me from islamabad with all the details. begin by telling us what this plan was supposedly all about. >> reporter: this was a look, a glimpse at high stakes international spying at its best. a very intricate plot but we should note it's not clear that it actually worked. here's what we do know. pakistani security official is telling us this pakistani doctor is in custody, being suspected of helping the cia set up a plot to find out where bin laden was hiding in abbottabad. they apparently set up a free vaccination campaign offering free vaccinations, free polio drops of the children and residents of abbottabad where this bin laden compound was located. according to the guardian paper, he had hired two nurses. these nurses were going home to home. the plan was to find bin laden's kids, get to them and somehow extract some blood or perhaps use the syringe from one of the vaccinations and match their dna samples with samples of bin laden's sister's dna, bin laden's sister passing away last year in boston, massachusetts. we haven't been able to verify i
this brutal killing. let's get more from islamabad. . reza? >> this is a graphic look at how ugly pakistan's war against the taliban can get. some of you may find this very disturbing. if you want to turn away, this is a good time to do so. let's walk you through the video, it was released by the taliban, posted online. it shows at least 14 men lined up, all of them wearing traditional pakistani garb. all of them appear to have their hands tied behind them. in front of them, you see three armed men. one is scolding the men, accusing them of being enemies of islams. saying these executions are about to take place in revenge for six children allegedly executed by pakistani security for forces. this is something military officials here vehemently deny ever happened. once theled skoing is done, that's when you see and hear the gun fire. let's watch and listen. [ gun firing ] >> during the gun fire, you see the men lined up topple to the ground. we're not going to show you what happens next. one or two of the gunmen walk to the men who were just shot and shoot them again. sometimes in the head
the bloody taliban. reza is in islamabad. >> reporter: wolf, this is a look at how brutal and ugly the war against taliban can look. we want to warn you, this is exclusive video. if you'd like to turn away, this is a good time to do so. let's walk you through this video. it was released by the taliban, posted online. it shows at least 14 men lined up, all of them wearing traditional pakistani garb, all of them with their hands tied behind their back. in front of them, you see three armed men. one of them is scolding the men lined up, accusing them of being enemies of islam, saying that these executions are about to take place in revenge for six children who were allegedly executed by pakistani security forces in the s.w.a.t. valley, a former pakistani strong hold. the military here, very mentally denies those executions took place. after the scolding is over, that's when you see and hear the gunfire. during the gunfire, you see these men topple to the ground and you hear them moaning and what happens next, one or two of these gunmen walk up to these victims sometimes in a head in an appare
in a protected mansion house one hour from islamabad. helicopters landed a group of u.s. navy seals. the al qaeda leader was killed. his body was buried at sea. the world wondered after the retaliation. >> today in particular we should remember the brave servicemen and women who have given their lives in the fight against terrorism around the world. osama bin laden was the manner responsible for 9/11, the terrific killing of americans that remains to this day the largest loss of british life in any terrorist attack. the head of a family group put it as this -- we were raised obviously never to hope for someone's death, but we are willing to make an exception in this case. he was evil personified the and we are willing to make an exception. for those that lost family members on 9/11, i am sure that my friend agrees that the sobering reality is that things are unchanged after the death of osama bin laden. threats remain. adequate resources and effective cooperation remain essential. >> where he had been found and had been living for the past five years, the idea that this country would continue to
as islamabad's van guard for the conquest of afghanistan. in the process they set in place a fundamentalist antiwestern radical terrorist state. let's note that even after 9/11, after 3,000 of our citizens had been slaughtered, the i.s.i. continued to covertly support radical islamic terrorists and they are still engaged in such hostile acts, even as american lives are being lost even today. in 2010 the london school of economics published a report that found agents of the i.s.i., this is 2010, long after 9/11, were, quote, funding and training the afghan taliban, end of quote. and the top things are -- to top this off, there is substantial reporting that has been done that suggests that pakistani diplomats are lobbying the afghanistan government -- afghan government leaders suggesting that they dump the united states and turn to china for a partnership and re-- in reconstruction. this isn't shame on them, this is shame on us. washington may be able to coerce and bribe islamabad into doing us a favor now and then, but it is time to face reality. the goals and values of the united states and
a base that it had in islamabad and end u.s. operations at an airbase. although the united states denies that occurred, pakistan still said that that has ended those operations. and of course drones carry out strikes against the taliban and al qaeda militants in pakistan's border with afghanistan. and lastly transparency international has rated 178 countries in corruption and pakistan, our so-called ally, is rated the 143rd most corrupt, beating out, of course, bangladesh and nigeria who have less corruption in their governments. so we're dealing with the corrupt government, we don't know where our money is going, it may end up in the hands of people who hate us, it's being wasted, the taliban or the pakistan military, the pakistan government is trying to play at least two sides, our side, their side, they may be on a third side, who knows? but $1 billion that we send them for so-called reimbursement of the war on terror, we can stop that. they're unan faithful ally. only 17% of the pakistan citizens say they like the united states. that puts 83% that do not like the united states. we do
in islam bought and you can see -- into a slum of blog -- in islamabad. those who thought that al qaeda was the major threat and those who thought that the u.s. were a major threat were more or less equal in number. there were less people concerned about india. that is the correct factual position. it was short after the incident where osama bin laden was taken out and the feeling in pakistan was that the u.s. had violated pakistan's sovereignty in doing that. that the u.s. could have done the same with pakistan's cooperation. that was the divide within pakistan that was reflected in that. a simplistic analysis of it is -- it is more nuanced. even those people who did not mind osama bin laden being taken out, they thought that the u.s. should not have done it laterally. i have a problem in my backyard, but you can ring my doorbell and asked to help you clean it up or you can jump my wall and do-it- yourself. there will be two different .eactions to those t pakistan is not very well liked by the united states either right now. that always has to do with how perceptions are being presente
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